About

About Greenville Tech Foundation

Established in 1973, The Greenville Tech Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit corporation totally separate from Greenville Technical College but operating for the benefit of the college.


The Foundation is an exempt organization under the Internal Revenue Code's section 501(c)(3) and is further classified as a public charity under section 509(a)(1) of the Code.

It is governed by a board of directors comprised of recognized Greenville County leaders in business, industry, and the professions.

The Foundation was established to ensure that the college is able to provide a quality college education at modest costs and to reduce financial barriers to higher education.

The Foundation provides financial support to the college and students beyond that which can be obtained from state and local funding sources.

The Foundation acquires its funding through charitable contributions from businesses, industries, foundations, organizations, and individuals.

These tax-deductible contributions are made by cash, real or personal property, securities, bequests, or by naming the Foundation as beneficiary of insurance policies, trusts, or retirement plans.

Gifts are designated or unrestricted and are made on a one-time basis or spread over several years.

History

The Greenville Tech Foundation, Inc. is a fully-chartered 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation totally separate from Greenville Technical College but operating for the exclusive benefit of the College.  It was established in 1973 and is governed by a Board of Directors comprised of recognized leaders in business, industry, and the professions. 

The Foundation was established to ensure that the College is able to continue its commitment of providing a quality college education at modest costs and reducing financial barriers to higher education.  The Foundation provides financial support to the students and the College beyond that which can be obtained from state and local funding sources. 

The Foundation acquires its funding from charitable contributions from businesses, foundations, organizations, and individuals.  The tax-deductible contributions are made by cash, real or personal property, securities, bequests, gift annuities, or by naming the Foundation as beneficiary of insurance policies or trusts.  Gifts are designated or unrestricted, and are made on a one-time basis or spread over several years.

In 1986, the Foundation embarked on its first capital campaign, known as the Silver Anniversary Campaign.  This three-year campaign raised $515,188 and an additional $500,000 gift to the college for the Michelin Center. Total amount of all gifts for the College and the Foundation during the campaign was $2,290,690 (114.5% of the goal.)  The Campaign was chaired by Robert C. Crawford, Buck Mickel, and Les McGraw. 

James D. Cockman chaired the second capital campaign, known as the Major Gifts Campaign, from 1994 - 1997.  This campaign raised $1,981,146, and an additional $467,899 in deferred gifts.  A total of $10,185,036 of all gifts to the College and the Foundation was raised during this campaign (203.7% of the goal.)  

The Partners Working for Success major gifts campaign began in 1997 and was co-chaired by Robert E. Coleman and Douglass E. Kondra.  The Honorary Chair was Walt Brashier.  The comprehensive goal was $9.3 million and the challenge goal was $15 million. A total of $17,408,333 of all gifts to the college and Foundation was raised during this six-year campaign (177% of the goal.) 

In 1999, the Foundation purchased the interior common area and shops of McAlister Square and the College purchased the three former department stores.  The University Center and the college’s student Admissions & Registration Center occupy the north and south end of the mall respectively.  The former Belk store was demolished in 2019.  The Foundation leases the interior of the mall to non-profit organizations, restaurants, and businesses.

The Foundation’s Student Housing opened in the fall of 2006.  The 121 garden-style apartments house 438 students.  In April of 2015, the Foundation hired a third-party management company to oversee the leasing and management of the complex.

Groundbreaking for the Brashier Charter School in Simpsonville was held in the fall of 2008.  The Foundation owns the building and the college leases the building and sub-leases part of it to the Brashier Charter Middle College School.

In 2014, the Foundation received the largest cash gift in its history, a $3 million donation from Jim and Evelyn Benson.  In recognition of the gift, the Greer Campus was renamed the Benson Campus.

In late 2014, the Foundation began planning a capital campaign, Empowering Tomorrow, to raise funds primarily for equipment and additional scholarships.  The first phase of the campaign, executed in 2015, raised approximately $3.4 million in cash and pledges.  Phase 2 of the campaign raised an additional $2.8 million in cash and pledges for a total of $6.2 million raised during the Empowering Tomorrow campaign.

In March of 2016, Melvin and Dollie Younts donated $1 million to fund two entrances to the College’s Center for Manufacturing Innovation.  Opened in the Fall of 2016, this 100,000 square foot facility located adjacent to CUICAR provides an engaging environment that gives students the tools needed to succeed in advanced manufacturing careers and employers the skilled workforce required for commercial success. Gene Haas donated over $2 million for the naming of CMI.

In 2018, the Foundation received a $2 million donation from Dolores “Dodie” Anderson for the Dreisbach/Anderson Student Success Center on the Barton Campus.  Student admissions and registration will move to the Center in the fall of 2021.

In 2019, the Foundation negotiated a 20-year lease for the new Truist Center for Culinary and Hospitality Innovation Center and Foundation offices at the Poe West development located at 556 W. Perry Avenue. Over $2 million was donated to renovate and upfit the Center and Foundation offices. The Center opened in July of 2020. Over several years, the Foundation has continued to support students through scholarships and more recently, with student emergency needs beyond tuition, books and fees.

In 2020, the Foundation provided 508 students with scholarships valued at over $450,000 and assisted 165 students with emergency needs totaling more than $55,000. In 2021, the Foundation is preparing to launch a $10 million campaign for a new Arts & Health Sciences building on the Barton Campus.

Foundation Leadership:

Board of Directors

W. Louis Williams, 1973-1975

William Bradshaw, 2001-2004

Gerald P. Rosenberg, 1983-1986

Natalma M. McKnew, 2004-2006

Richard H. Stofan, 1987

Charles Warne, 2006-2008

H. Neel Hipp, Jr., 1988

Claude I. Theisen, 2008-2010

Harry B. Ussery, 1989-1990

James Morton, Jr., 2010-2012

Robert E. Coleman, 1991-1992

Hunter Howard, 2012-2014

John M. Sterling, Jr., 1993-1995

Tim Reed, 2014-2016

Nell W. Stewart, 1995-1997

Sam Erwin, 2016-2018

James D. Cockman, 1997-1998

Will Huss, 2019-2020

James E. Jones, Jr., 1998-2000

Stacy Brandon, 2021-present

Douglass E. Kondra, 2000-2002

 

                                                                                           

Executive Directors

William D. Workman, III

J. Ray Mixon

Dr. Rennie Wolfe

James E. Stewart, Jr.

Elaine Huff-Lowe

G. Frederick Payne

Robert E. Howard

Ann M. Wright


Overview of the Foundation's purpose and impact (2 minute video)

Ann Wright, Vice President of Advancement at the Greenville Tech Foundation, gives an overview of the Foundation's purpose and impact in this brief interview done by UpstateBizSC.com for their 1/8/19 Non Profit Minute segment. Special thanks go to UpstateBizSC.com for sharing this video with us.